Wednesday, September 1, 2010

I Hate the Piano

Audrey's been taking piano lessons for a couple of years now, and you might say that she has a love/hate relationship with it.  There have been so many ups and downs and I would have given up long ago, but she really has musical ability and I think it's good for her brain. 

We waited until she had been taking lessons for almost a year before we bothered to buy a keyboard for her to practice on at home.  Once we bought one, she was completely obsessed with it for like 3 months.  Then she broke her arm.  Which was followed by her refusing to play with said arm long after the cast was off.  After she got over that, she then decided that some of the lower octaves were mortally terrifying, which limited us to playing songs exclusively in the Chipmunk range.  Then she started this tic where she couldn't have both of her hands resting on the keyboard.  She would peck out a note and then pull her hand away like she had just touched something scalding hot. 

Honest to Christ, everything with this kid feels like a 1/4 of a step up and 10 steps back.  The piano is a good example of her non-linear progression in learning anything.  Every time we hit one of these walls, I have to send out the bat signal, convene the team to brainstorm ideas, write social stories, make a video model, create a new ABA program....aaaaaarrrgggghhhhh.  Can't anything just go from point A to B to C without requiring a fucking 12-step intervention?

I can't wait to see what irrational fear/tic crops up next.  Blackkeyophobia?  Using nothing but her tongue for middle C?  Refusing to play out of The Sound of Music book?  Oh no, I know you did not just disrespect The Sound of Music.

Coming tomorrow:  I Love the Piano.

13 comments:

  1. Linear progression? Never heard of it. For us it's almost like the whack-a-mole game. You smack down one of the annoying rodents and four more pop up out of holes you never knew existed. Thats why we are almost afraid when one bad behavior or stim goes away. The next one could be worse. And there always is a 'next' one.

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  2. Lynn, it's just the piano. Go with the flow. Don't get too involved in her trying to play it. She's only six. Let it develop as she gets older. She may take it more seriously later on. My mother must have been equally frustrated with me....I would tap out a song with one hand and she could hear the chords that should be played with other in her head, but I'd never play it. Drove her NUTS!

    When she gets like this, move onto something else. Don't drive yourself crazy.

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  3. Personally, I think that somewhere in my youth (or childhood) I must have done something really heinous -- to deserve a first day of kindergarten like we've had over here today --
    Your 1/4 step forward, 10 steps back paragraph really resonates.

    [Disrespect The Sound of Music? Never!]

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  4. Hee. Looking forward to "I Love the Piano". I'm sure it'll be a nice counterpoint, er, counter melody.

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  5. I love bigdaddyautism's response about linear progression! Hilarious!!
    Doesn't happen here either. Been thinking of lessons for the bird, too. But I'd be shocked if she played with anything but her tongue

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  6. "Easy is boring, easy is boring, easy is boring, easy is boring...." Maybe if I say it enough it will not be bullsh@#!

    Yesterdays "confusion" was that contractions are OUT! So I would use the contraction "don't". GA would interrupt/correct me by saying "DO NOT." And I was like "DO NOT what?" I'd continue.....She'd interrupt "DO NOT!"
    "Do not 'what' GraceAnne?" It took us 20 minutes to figure out what the hell was going on. All I'm trying to find out is what's the guy's name on first base?!

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  7. J-man totally starts to lose his cookies right before a big leap in development, but I always forget this. Usually it involves an extended freak out by me, wondering why he has turned into a complete PITA, and then, like magic... he calms down and makes progress. And then I go "DUH!".

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  8. I absolutely love the whack-a-mole comparison used by BigDaddy!

    I wanna see a video of Audrey playing :) on a love day.

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  9. One of the first posts that I ever read at Cheryl D's blog was about the Whack-a-Mole metaphor: http://littlebitquirky.blogspot.com/2010/06/w-is-for-whack-mole.html

    ...I've used that analogy many times because it so perfectly describes what we go through.

    @joymama: I've often thought that I'm being punished for something...but unless we are some sort of Ambien-induced sleepwalking serial killers, there's NO WAY. I'll look for a recap of your first day from hell on your blog (http://elvis-sightings.blogspot.com/)<===check it out y'all!

    @Aimee: I never know who's on first around here....another great analogy. No contractions? WTF?

    @Pia: from your lips to God's ear...maybe she's about to bust out some serious concertos.

    @Heather: you will get your wish tomorrow during the "love" portion of our program.

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  10. I can so relate. David had five "piano" lessons, during which time he never played a single note. Go figure.

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  11. LOL! I saw Big Daddy's comment and was going to post a huge I AGREE! Then I saw your comment and link to my Whack-a-Mole post! Thank you! It's really true for us! When we're successful at snuffing out one bad issue a totally new one will pop up somewhere else. It's so frustrating!

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  12. LOL! That's a big negatory on the A > B > C without the drama! Sigh.

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  13. And by the time the team writes the damn social story and laminates it, it will be on to the next thing. We have a social story graveyard beginning to form in the playroom.

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