Tuesday, February 22, 2011

Fear and Loathing: Preschool Screening Edition


I have another of my semi-monthly articles up on my local Patch today.  It should hopefully prove to be less controversial than my last one.

This time around I'm writing about these signs that periodically pop up around my town directing parents to "preschool screenings".  Yeah, I know what that means.  Or at least I thought I did.  Click here to see how the drama in my head compares to the reality.

9 comments:

  1. Knowledge is power! We always fear what we don't know or understand. Doesn't hurt to ask!

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  2. Oh my! That would make me nervous too! Except I haven't had a pre schooler in such a long time. I miss having one of them in the house!

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  3. I'm glad we didn't have to do that (we were in EI too). And I still feel sick to my stomach when we drive past the building where Andrew took the ADOS.

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  4. Oh, and I just read your last "controversial" post (loved it) and the comments (ummm... wow).

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  5. I used to administer those screenings as part of my job as a preschool special education teacher. I did see kids who clearly had autism come in with no diagnosis and vague parental concerns. I also had a child come in at the age of three whom I discovered was severely hearing impaired, yet no one in his family had noticed. He was just "a bad boy, he not listen". Then there were the funny parents who freaked because a two year old could not say the letter r correctly. Hell, I still have a lisp so I am sure my doing the screening was very reassuring. We were not allowed to give a diagnosis at the screening, only refer for more comprehensive testing and suggest strategies to use at home. I literally once had a child climbing the walls of the screening room, and the parent just sitting there watching like "see, I told you he had problems".

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  6. I read your article. You do such a good job writing. Even though Cody is in his late twenty's (Okay. He's 29. I have MAJOR issues with the fact that he'll be turning 30 this summer.), I still remember those sad and dramatic early years. Do you think it's pathetic that I push those memories right back to the back of my mind when they resurface? As I am writing this, I'm thinking that I might need therapy. ;)

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  7. Great article! I hope they're paying you the big bucks!

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  8. I had to laugh at 6 timer.

    well, i think most pre-k ppl are stupid. I feel like i had to educate them all along on autism issues. No one ever caught my son(s) early. It was always me urging them that there is something wrong but all these "professionals" never saw anything wrong. In general, (from my experience)they have limited knowledge and only think autism is a nonverbal tantruming out of touch child.

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